Core

(1 customer review)

$69.00

Send us your hair and let us do the rest! Testing your intolerances and sensitivities with no doctor’s appointment! A non-invasive alternative to traditional intolerance and sensitivity testing and screening. If you believe your food is affecting your health, this is the test for you.

By using the latest technology we analyse 4-5 strands of hair, and test it against over 200 food and non-food substances, such as gluten, lactose, milk wheat and egg intolerance. Also included in the Total Premium test, we scan the same hair for any nutritional deficiencies your body might have, in order for you to change your diet or get supplements to be the best you. We are all unique and you deserve to know what your body wants!

If you are looking for a complete scan, buy the Total Premium instead, which tests against 880 items.

SKU: 003-1 Category:

Description

200 different food and non-food items

We use your submitted hair sample to test against over 200 different food and non-food items to see which item will cause a reaction due to an intolerance.  Please see video on how to take the test.

What are we testing?

  • 150 of the most common food items including wheat, dairy, teas, egg, vegetables, and meat
  • 50 of the most common non-food items including pollen, dogs, cats etc.

The test results will be delivered in a PDF document where your intolerances and deficiencies are presented in a tabular form.

How to take the test?

Send us your hair and let us do the rest! Testing your intolerances and sensitivities without a doctor’s appointment!

A non-invasive alternative to traditional intolerance and sensitivity testing and screening.

NON FOOD ITEMS (60)

Acetylised starch (modified starch)Thickening agent in many products.
Alder (Alnus glutinosa)A tree of the beech genus.
Aspen (Populus tremula)Tree native to Europe and Asia.
AsterA type of flower.
Barley (Hordeum vulgare)A major cultivated cereal grain. Often in beer.
BovinesAn animal of the cattle group, which also includes buffaloes and bison.
CatsCommon house pet
Chrysanthemum (C. morifolium)A perennial plant.
CottonA soft white fibrous substance which surrounds the seeds of the cotton plant and is made into textile fibre and thread for sewing.
Dahlia (Dahlia hybrida)Dahlia is a genus of bushy, tuberous, herbaceous perennial plants native to Mexico.
DogsCommon household pet.
Downy birch (Betula verrico)Downy birch is a deciduous broadleaf tree native to the UK
Duck
DustConsists of particles from the atmosphere and environment, such as soil.
E 1202 Polyvinyl polypyrrolidoneWine, beer, pharmaceuticals.
E 216 Propyl-para-hydroxybenzoate (PHB Ester)It is a preservative typically found in many water-based cosmetics, such as creams, lotions, shampoos and bath products.
E413 TragacanthA natural gum, used in leather work and paints. 67%
Elder (Sambucus nigra)The plant that produces the elderberry.
False acacia (Robinia pseudacacia)A species of tree.
FungusIncluding moulds, mushrooms, and toadstools.
Glaskraut (Parietaria judaica)A spreading plant with highly allergenic pollen.
Glaskraut (Parietaria officinalis)No stinging plant. The plant grows on rubbish and on walls, hence the name.
GlatthaferTall false-oat grass, usually found in meadows.
GoatsDomesticated animal.
Goldenrod (Solidago virgaurea)Solidago virgaurea is an herbaceous perennial plant of the family Asteraceae.
Goose feathersFeathers from this species of bird. Often used in household furniture.
Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.)Trees that produce small white-pink flowers and red berries.
Hyacinth (Endymion non scriptus)Hyacinthus is a small genus of bulbous, fragrant flowering plants.
HyaluronidaseUsed in medication.
Jasmine (Philadelphus spp.)Plant with white flowers and strong fragrance.
Kammgras (Cynosurus cristatus)Also known as crested dog’s tail – characterised by a seed head that is flat on one side.
LeatherMaterial made from the skin of an animal by tanning or other similar process.
Lycraan elastic polyurethane fibre or fabric used especially for close-fitting sports clothing.
Marguerite (Leucanthemum vulgare)A type of daisy flower. Also known as the Oxeye daisy.
Meadow fox tail (Alopecurus prat.)A common type of grass.
Melde (Artiplex spp.)A bush type plant. Also known as saltbush.
MisteltoeCommon name for the plant which produces small white berries. Traditionally used to decorate the house during the festive period.
Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris)Aromatic plant. Occasionally used in food and beer.
Narcissus (Narcissus spp.)A genus of predominantly spring perennial plants.
NylonA tough, lightweight, elastic synthetic polymer with a protein-like chemical structure.
Oak (Quercus robur)Large tree. Native to Europe.
Pear treeType of tree which produces the fruit.
Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne)Also known as English ryegrass.
Pine, Scottish (Pinus sylvestris)Species of pine tree. also known as Scot’s pine.
Poplar (Populus spp.)Deciduous flowering tree.
RatsRodent, commonly known as a pest in urban environments.
RubberA tough elastic polymeric substance made from the latex of a tropical plant or synthetically.
RyeA grass grown extensively as a grain.
Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica)A plant, that if touched stings the skin.
Sweet vernal grass (Anthoxanthum odoratum)Sweet scented grass. Grown in meadows as hay grass.
Tall oat grass (Arrhenaterium elatius)Tall grass found meadows.
ThistleCommon name of a group of flowering plants characterised by leaves with sharp prickles on the margins – usually purple in colour.
Timothy grass (Phleum pratense)A grass widely grown in the UK, thought to be a trigger of asthma.
Tobaccoa preparation of the nicotine-rich leaves of an American plant, which are cured by a process of drying and fermentation for smoking or chewing.
Wallflower (Cheiranthus cheiri)A widely cultivated flowering plant.
WaspA social insect, known for its tendency to sting. Typically black and yellow.
Water reed (Phragmites communis)A tall grass found in reed beds.
Velvet grass (Holcus lanatus)A tall grass.
Wheat (Triticum aestivum)A cereal grain, grown in fields. This intolerance refers to the pollen and spores give off from the plant. The grain can still be eaten.
Wild oat (Avena fatua)A species of grass from the oat family.
WillowType of tree.
WoolThe fine, soft curly or wavy hair forming the coat of a sheep, goat, or similar animal, especially when shorn and prepared for use in making cloth or yarn.

FOOD ITEMS (165)
AlcoholA colourless volatile flammable liquid which is produced by the natural fermentation of sugars and is the intoxicating constituent of wine, beer, spirits, and other drinks, and is also used as an industrial solvent and as fuel.
AlmondAn edible nut, oval in shape with a woody shell. Often used in cooking / baking
Apples (Cooked)A fruit – numerous different species. Colours are usually green and red.
Apples (Raw)A fruit – numerous different species. Colours are usually green and red.
Apricots (Raw)A stone fruit, usually orange in colour. A great source of Vitamin A
Artichoke (Cooked)A variety of thistle, cultivated for eating
Artichoke (Raw)A variety of thistle, cultivated for eating
AsparagusEaten as a vegetable. Also known as Garden asparagus.
Avocado (Raw)A pear shaped fruit, with rough and oily skin. Often eaten in salads and cooking.
BarleyA major cultivated cereal grain. Often in beer.
Beans (broad)Small, flat beans. Green in colour, also called fava beans
Beans (green)Long, thin green in colour.
BeefThe flesh of a cow, bull or ox.
BeerAn alcoholic drink made from yeast-fermented malt flavoured with hops
Beets (beetroot)A dark red, rounded vegetable
Bilberries (Cooked)Very small, almost black berries.
Bilberries (Raw)Very small, almost black berries.
Blackberries (Cooked)Edible soft fruit. Often purple-black
BlueberryA small sweet fruit. Often blue or black in colour.
Brazil nutA large, three-sided South American nut
Bread, white breadBread made with white wheat flour.
Broad beanLarge, flat edible green bean. Eaten without the pod.
Brussels sproutSmall, compact bud of the cabbage family. Eaten as a vegetable.
BuckwheatDerived from the seeds of a flowering plant. Does not contain gluten
ButterA dairy product, made with the natural fat found in milk (milk fat)
Butter (salted)Butter that has added salt
ButtermilkButtermilk is the liquid left behind after churning butter out of cream.
Cabbage (cooked)Cabbage or headed cabbage is a leafy green or purple biennial plant, grown as an annual vegetable crop for its dense-leaved heads
Cashew nutEdible kidney shaped nut. Rich in oil and protein
Cauliflower (cooked)The flower head of the cauliflower eaten as a vegetable
Cauliflower (Raw)Edible variety of cabbage. Large white head and green leaves
CheeseCheese is a food derived from milk that is produced in a wide range of flavors, textures, and forms by coagulation of the milk protein casein.
ChestnutEdible, hard brown nut. Often roasted before eating.
ChickenMost common type of poultry.
CocoaCocoa powder made into a hot drink.
CoconutLarge seed with edible flesh. Used in cooking/ juices/ flavourings.
CodA large edible marine fish.
ColaA brown carbonated drink that is flavoured with an extract of cola nuts, or with a similar flavouring.
CornflakesA breakfast cereal made with toasted flakes of corn.
Cow’s milkMilk obtained from dairy cows.
CranberriesVery small, red coloured fruit.
CreamCream is a dairy product composed of the higher-butterfat layer skimmed from the top of milk.
CressFast growing, edible herb
DuckA water bird, known for its short legs and webbed feet.
EelEdible slender fish.
FigFresh or dried – soft, sweet dark fruit
GingerHot, fragrant spice. Used as a flavouring mainly but can be found chopped, powdered, preserved or candied.
GlutenGluten. Present in wheat and rye.
GoatA domesticated animal. The flesh of this animal can be eaten.
Goat’s milkMilk from the animal.
GooseA species of duck. The meat of the bird is widely eaten.
Gooseberries (Chinese)Also known as kiwi fruit
Gooseberries (cooked)Small and firm but sometimes ribbed and translucent, gooseberries are a unique little plant-based food growing on relatively small, thorny bushes
Grapefruit (Pink)Large, round citrus fruit with edible flesh.
Grapes (red)This includes items made with grapes – i.e. wine.
Grapes (white)This includes items made with grapes – i.e. wine.
HalibutNorthern marine fish, eaten worldwide.
HazelnutsSmall, brown edible nut from the hazel tree.
Herring (red)A dried smoked herring, which is turned red by the smoke.
Honeydew melonPopular variety of melon with yellow skin and edible, white flesh.
Horse radishRoot vegetable used as a spice, most commonly used as a sauce
LettuceCultivated plant eaten in salads mostly. This includes all varieties of lettuce.
MaizeThis is corn. It is used in products such as; corn flakes, polenta, tortillas.
Maize flourMaize flour is the entire corn kernel milled into flour
MilkMilk is a pale liquid produced by the mammary glands of mammals
Milk lactoseThis indicates intolerance to lactose found within dairy milk.
MilletCereal mostly used to make flour.
MustardHot tasting yellow paste. Eaten and used in cooking.
Mustard (green)Dark leafy green vegetable.
NoodlesMade from unleavened dough which is stretched, extruded, or rolled flat. This item is referring to ramen type noodles (found in ready to go noodles – Pot noodles, supernoodles)
NutmegA very common spice, related to mace
Oats (porridge)Also known as Oatmeal in the United States. Commonly eaten for breakfast.
OkraA vegetable also known as ladies fingers. Part of the mallow family.
Olives (green)Small, edible fruit. Used for oils and in cooking.
Onion (Raw)Pungent vegetable, can be eaten raw. Very commonly used in cooking.
PaprikaRed powdered spice used in cooking.
ParsleyPlant used as a cooking herb or garnish for food.
Peaches (raw)Round stone fruit with juicy flesh
PeanutsVery commonly eaten nut. Eaten raw, also used in cooking.
PearsA sweet fruit.
Pecan nutsEdible, smooth brown nut from the pecan tree.
Pepper (green)The pepper – green in colour. Often used to flavour cooking
Pepper (red)The pepper – red in colour – often used to flavour cooking.
PineapplesLarge, juicy fruit with hard skin and edible yellow flesh.
Plantain (Plantago major)Common plant. Known for its broad, shell shaped leaf.
PorkFlesh of a pig.
Prunes (cooked)A prune is a dried plum.
QuinceSimilar to the pear in appearance, usually golden-yellow when mature.
Raspberries (raw)An edible soft fruit related to the blackberry, consisting of a cluster of reddish-pink drupelets.
RiceSmall white or brown grains
RyeA grass grown extensively as a grain, foods containing rye, include bread and crackers
SageAromatic herb used in cooking.
SalmonLarge, usually pink fish. Very popular food.
Sesame seedOil rich seeds from the sesame plant.
Sheep’s milkMilk from the Sheep.
ShellfishSome crustaceans commonly eaten are shrimp, lobsters, crayfish, and crabs
ShrimpsA small free-swimming crustacean with an elongated body, typically marine and frequently of commercial importance as food.
SoyaIncludes all products made with the soya bean.
SpeltA type of wheat, also known as dinkel wheat.
Strawberries (Raw)Edible, sweet fruit. Red with seed studded skin.
Tea (Black)This is normal ‘Tetley’ type tea and it does include tea with milk in.
Tea (green)Green tea is a type of tea that is made from Camellia sinensis leaves that have not undergone the same withering and oxidation process used to make oolong and black tea.
Turkey, henFlesh from the bird.
WalnutsEdible seed eaten raw or used in cooking / baking.
WatercressA salad leaf
WheatA cereal grain.
Wheat flourWheat flour is a powder made from the grinding of wheat.
WhiskyA spirit distilled from malted grain, especially barley or rye.
WhitefishCommon name for several species of fish – including cod, haddock, hake and pollock.
E 100 CurcuminFood colour, whose colour ranges from yellow to red, depending on pH (acidity).
E 101 Riboflavin (Vit. B2)Yellow food colouring. Used in various products.
E 102 TartrazineYellow food colouring.
E 104 Quinoline yellowA synthetic ‘coal tar’ dye varying in colour between a dull yellow and greenish-yellow. Found in ices, scotch eggs and smoked haddock.
E 110 Sunset yellow FCF.A synthetic ‘coal tar’ and yellow dye used in fermented foods which must be heat treated. Orange squash, orange jelly, marzipan, Swiss roll, apricot jam, citrus marmalade, lemon curd.
E 1105 LysozymePreservative; it degrades the cell wall of bacteria.
E 120 Cochineal, carminic acid, carmineRed colouring found in alcoholic drinks, bakery products and toppings, biscuits, desserts, drinks, icings, pie fillings.
E 1200 PolydextroseThickening agent and filling agent. Binds water and protects against freeze damage.
E 122 CarmoisineRed food colour – in blancmange, marzipan, Swiss roll, jams and preserves, sweets, brown sauce, flavoured yogurts, packet soups, jellies.
E 123 AmaranthFood additive derived from the herbaceous plant.
E 124 Ponceau 4RRed food colour.
E 127 ErythrosineA cherry-pink/red synthetic coal tar dye found in cocktail, glacé and tinned cherries, canned fruit, sweets, dressed crab, salmon spread and packet trifle mix.
E 128 Rot 2 GRed food colour. Restricted use in confectionery and meat products.
E 129 Allura red ACRed food colour. Restricted use in confectionery and meat products.
E 131 Patent blue VBlue food colouring.
E 132 Indigo carmineBlue food colour.
E 133 Brilliant blue FCFBlue food colouring. Ice cream and a few other food products, but mostly in cosmetics.
E 140 Chlorophylls and chlorophyllinsGreen food colour.
E 1404 Oxidierte starchThickening agent and stabiliser.
E 141 ChlorophyllsGreen food colour.
E Quinoline yellowA synthetic ‘coal tar’ dye varying in colour between a dull yellow and greenish-yellow. Found in ices, scotch eggs and smoked haddock.
E Cochineal, carminic acid, carmineRed colouring found in alcoholic drinks, bakery products and toppings, biscuits, desserts, drinks, icings, pie fillings.
E PolydextroseThickening agent and filling agent. Binds water and protects against freeze damage.
E ErythrosineA cherry-pink/red synthetic coal tar dye found in cocktail, glacé and tinned cherries, canned fruit,
E Patent blue VBlue food colouring.
E Monostarch phosphate (modified starch)Thickening agent and stabiliser in many products
E Acetylised di-starch phosphate (modified starch)Thickening agent in many products
E Acetylised starch (modified starch)Thickening agent in many products
E Acetylised di-starch adipate (modified starch)Thickening agent in many products
E d Ammonium sulphite CaramelBrown to black in colour. Found in brown foods.
E Triethyl citrateFlavour component in many products
E f Ethyl ester of enoicbeta – apo – ‘ – Carot acid
E LycopeneDark red food colouring.
E AluminiumAs a food additive it is used solely for external decoration of sugar-coated flour confectionery, in cake decorations and to give a silvery finish to pills and tablets.
E Lithol rubineRed colour. Only used for surface coating of cheese.
E Sodium benzoate, benzoic acidFound in barbecue sauce, caviar, cheesecake mix, fruit pies, margarine, pickled cucumbers, pineapple juice, prawns, preserves, salad dressing, soya sauce, sweets and table olives.
E Sodium nitriteUsed for curing(preserving) meat and fish products
E Malic acidTypical products include non alcoholic beverages, chewing gum, gelatins, puddings, and fillings, hard and soft sweets, jams and jellies, processed fruits and fruit juices.
E Octyl gallate (Gallate)A food additive – Used in oils, margarine, lard and salad dressings.
E Sodium lactate (salts from lactic acid)Found in cheese, confectionary, icecream, fruit jellies, soups, canned fruits
E Orthophosphoric acid, Phosphoric acidFound in many products, mainly cola, meat and cheese products.
E Monosodium phosphate, Disodium, TrisodiumCan help increase the activity of anti-oxidants.
E Sodium malate, sodium hydrogen malateA natural acid present in fruits.
E a Eucheuma algae, treatedA type of red seaweed. Can be used as a thickening agent in cosmetics and some foods.
E Gum arabicAdditive used in soft drinks and gummy sweets such as marshmallow, M&M’s and gumdrops.
E Sorbit, Sorbit syrupMany bakery and confectionery products.
E Sucrose-acetate-isobutyrateA synthetic compound derived from cane sugar.
E Glycerine ester of root resin/colophonesterAn emulsifier and stabiliser used in the soft drinks industry.
E HydroxypropylmethylcelluloseMainly used as a thickening agent in many different products.
E Thermo-oxidised soya oilFound in magarine and similar fat emulsions for frying purposes.
E Sorbitan monolaurateFound in many products.
E Sorbitan mono-oleateEmulsifier and stabiliser – found in numerous different products.
E Glutamic acidGlutamic acid and glutamates have the specific umami taste and enhance many other flavours, thereby reducing the amounts of salt needed in a product.
E Guanylic acid, GuanylateFlavour enhancer used in many different products.
E Sodium guanylate, GuanylateFlavour enhancer used in many products.
E Inosinic acid, IonisateFlavour enhancer – enhance many other flavours, thereby reducing the amounts of salt or other flavour enhancers needed in a product.
E Dicalcium ionisateUsed in many products. Mainly used in low sodium/salt products.
E Disodium ‘-ribonucleotideUsed in many products. Mainly used in low sodium/salt products.
E Glycine and its sodium saltsMainly used for yeast in bread. Also used as a bread enhancer.
E IsomaltSweetener found in boiled sweets, toffee, lollipops, fudge, wafers, cough drops, throat lozenges, and a wide variety of other products.
E Maltite, Maltite syrupMaltitol is a sugar alcohol (a polyol) used as a sugar substitute
E Lecithin (E)Emulsifier and stabiliser of water-oil/fat mixtures. Used to soften chocolate.

Do you have further questions about the test? Send an email to sales@libertyhealthcheck.com.

1 review for Core

  1. hermann

    Hi, this is exactly what I was looking for, will order now. Thanks!

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